Architectural-Designer-Redline-Markups2018-10-02T07:44:54+00:00

Redline Markups and How Architectural Designers Use Them

General Guidelines for Markup Drawings

Architectural redline markups are a way of communicating your changes to the home designer or architect. Using red is important because it makes your changes stand out from the drawings. The main thing to remember is when you change one dimension it normally affects one or more other dimension. After you have the plan markup, scan or take picture and email it to me. If we need to meet I will be able to schedule a meeting after reviewing your markup.

Please see this example for correct markup format.
Architectural Designer Redline Markups

Two and Three Story

Be careful changing any dimension that will affect stairs. Redline markups that move stairs on one floor will change the floor opening or landing point on the floor above or below. Exterior walls have a similar problem when creating redlines. Moving exterior walls will almost always change the story above or below. Of course the roof will also be affected when moving exterior walls.

Windows and Doors

Generally a full preliminary set is prepared with floor plans and elevations. This is the time to comment on widows and doors. Occasionally a pre-preliminary is supplied when the square footage and room sizes are questionable. There is no need to comment on doors and windows at this time.

Exterior Finishes

Exterior finishes should be addressed when a full preliminary set is prepared but not a pre-preliminary.

Notes:

You will not be ready for the redline markup step until after you sketch your plan and the designer publishes the first preliminary set. Please see How to Draw a Simple House Floor Plan

Preliminary

A full preliminary set may contain floor plans, doors, windows, elevations, notes and schedules.

Pre-Preliminary

A pre-preliminary set generally contains incomplete floor plans only.

There is a great article about redline markups on the website Life of an Architect.